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Charlotte Erdmann

Sharks Zero In on Mobile Location Data

Charlotte Erdmann
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Anand
Anand
9/19/2013 6:34:54 AM
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One Bar
RE: Sharks Zero In on Mobile Location Data
I never knew that the smart phone is able to give that amount of information about the users. The amount of data that is got out of the servers is basically a gold mine that people could use. Marketers can be able to pin point the people they think would really need their services based on the description from the data. However, what I wonder is that how secure are these data? What is they fall into the wrong hands? Some people can use the same data to do illegal stuff like blackmail the phone owners. Generally, the data is a gold mine but the people who get them get top determine whether or not they will bring you benefits or harm.

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Susan Fogarty
Susan Fogarty
8/30/2013 11:55:20 AM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Useful data
Yes, but you can block tracking in your browser, can't you?

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Wirelessroamer
Wirelessroamer
8/30/2013 7:58:09 AM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Useful data
Not just Europe, the PRISM/NSA events have opened up concerns in the developing world. http://www.zdnet.com/google-and-facebook-express-concern-over-data-protection-laws-in-brazil-7000019508/

and UK law is no protection. Google do not regard online browsing activity as private, when challenge they insisted on bringing the case in USA and are claimed to have said it's "trivial".

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/aug/19/google-privacy-laws-uk-lawsuit

Read it ALL!

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Susan Fogarty
Susan Fogarty
8/30/2013 6:45:48 AM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Useful data
Wirelessroamer, I agree. Consumers should definitely need to opt in before their data is tracked, and before they are sent advertising. I know the EU has much better laws around online privacy, and we need to figure out how to extend them to mobile privacy as well. Especially since there are so many things that can be tracked through your mobile device.

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Wirelessroamer
Wirelessroamer
8/28/2013 4:00:35 PM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Useful data
@M.Kudla They also track IMEI (the device ID hard coded in the phone) and recorded with IMSI, Phone Number and all your personal data and history. Switching off the GPS is a start but as soon as you get in range of an IMEI tracker they've got you... 

There are Privacy rules in Europe. A new "right to be forgotten" was being implemented but Google headed it off in the courts.

I'll start a new track with some interesting BBC programme links on the Privacy subject.

We need a new economic model if we are not to sell our souls to the advertisers.

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Wirelessroamer
Wirelessroamer
8/28/2013 3:48:31 PM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Useful data
Hi Susan, I'm with you... see my other post... It should be done by informed consent of the consumer. Post PRISM consumers are becoming aware how much is known about them. They should opt-in for such services if they want them and realise they are sacrificing their privacy in return...

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Wirelessroamer
Wirelessroamer
8/28/2013 3:43:27 PM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Creep factor
@ Charlotte. I see the bad side outweighing advantages. I've been lobbying for context tracking to be off by default in new phones (Location included) and switched on as an acceptance of the risk by users. This works well with the European Data Protection Regulations and if regulated and enforced could protect user privacy.

Most Consumers have no idea how much data is being collected about them all the time and how their behaviour changes are tracked over time.. This is sold by Google (96% of their revenue), Microsoft, Amazon Facebook etc. and dozens of smaller collectors to advertisers, Governments and other criminals for targeting of Advertising spearphishing and other malware.

That's what PRISM was really about.

The excuse "it makes the internet cheaper" doesn't wash with me. I'd rather pay a little more for a clean, private, advert free, Network with search engines and Apps that did what I wanted not give me information Advertisers had paid for me to see.

We need a new commercial model and someone with the nerve to deliver it..... 

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Wirelessroamer
Wirelessroamer
8/28/2013 3:21:37 PM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Creep factor
Hi Toby. It's everywhere!!! Go to one of the big shopping Malls e.g. Westfield, Bluewater etc. or one of the big department stores after you have been searching for stuff online and watch the adverts. They can track you (by IMEI usually) and display ads based on your tastes and budget. They know the LOT. Full Context awareness. 96% of Google revenue comes from selling personal information.

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Toby
Toby
8/27/2013 5:34:54 AM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Creep factor
I was thinking about this (LBA) yesterday and how it would work if it could integrate with a satnav system in a car. It could be very interesting. For example it could advise the driver which stations were offering cheaper fuel or who had the best coffee :)

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Charlotte Erdmann
Charlotte Erdmann
8/27/2013 5:26:32 AM
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Creep factor
@Toby: I know it is used in Germany and some of the german companies offer it in UK and Italy, too. The problem seems to be the advertisers which are not willing to pay the higher price for LBA. I think we will see it in the near future all over the planet.

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