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Richard Adhikari

Your BYOD Program May Fail

Richard Adhikari
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Mobi
Mobi
2/13/2014 11:12:04 PM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Personal devices
"Agree with you, Mobi, but not entirely...employers want users to bring in their own devices so they can cut costs...if you're not comfortable with their laying down the rules, tell them to provide you with a mobile device for work..."

Richard, am aware about rights of employees, but question the employer may not be feasible always because of the fluxuating job market. When 99% peoples are abide to follow the rule; how one can get question the system? 

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RichardA1!
RichardA1!
2/11/2014 6:49:00 PM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Personal devices
Correct, MobileSuze, from the company's point of view this is a business decision...but from the user's point of view it might be an imposition. If I as a user looked at the issue from a business perspective, I would say that I was getting the worst of the deal - I have to purchase my own device, submit it to wear and tear doing the company's work, and may be compensated only for part of the cost of subscribing to the service.

On top of that, corporate can come in and delete all my personal files as well as the business files if it deems that wiping the device is necessary.

This is where the tension lies, and it's where things are going to play out. Neither side has all the right or is all wrong; the key is to balance the company's and the worker's needs. It's going to be a fascinating exercise...

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Mobi
Mobi
2/11/2014 5:25:45 AM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Personal devices
"It's give or take. Companies green light BYOD programs after considering the pros and cons, because they've determined the pros to be much more advantageous to the company. Remember, at the very end, it all boils down to whether or not it will add value to the organization as a whole. "

Mobilesuze, it's not a fair give and take policy. From employee's side it's like a giving policy, surrendering all rights and in return restricted access. Ok its limited to willing peoples and not mandidatory for everybody.

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MobileSuze
MobileSuze
2/11/2014 12:51:02 AM
User Rank
One Bar
Re: Personal devices
Richard, the solution you presented is very smart and is something that I know many firms are actually doing with their BYOD policies. The thing is, you have to remember that this is a business decision at its very core, and companies have to safeguard their data.

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MobileSuze
MobileSuze
2/11/2014 12:49:33 AM
User Rank
One Bar
Re: Personal devices
Both management and employees have to come to an agreement on BYOD policies that will work for both parties. Unfortunately (and obviously), management has a bigger say because that's just how things work in corporate situations.

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RichardA1!
RichardA1!
2/10/2014 4:26:08 PM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Personal devices
That's what I mean by employers having the upper hand, Mobi. I agree they should be able to wipe data from a device if needed, but I don't think they should be able to wipe a user's personal data from the device. If my employer were that concerned about this issue, I'd suggest they provide me a corporate mobile device that I would use only for company business. That way, everyone would be satisfied.

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RichardA1!
RichardA1!
2/10/2014 4:23:49 PM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Personal devices
Compromise is a good thing, MobileSuze, provided both sides are equally free to agree to the terms. However, that's not always the case; generally, employers have the upper hand. If they gave employees the alternative of using a company-provided device at work, that would be more fair, methinks.

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RichardA1!
RichardA1!
2/10/2014 4:20:44 PM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Personal devices
Agree with you, Mobi, but not entirely...employers want users to bring in their own devices so they can cut costs...if you're not comfortable with their laying down the rules, tell them to provide you with a mobile device for work...

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Mobi
Mobi
2/9/2014 11:10:22 PM
User Rank
Five Bars
Re: Personal devices
"Everyone wants to have their cake and eat it to.  There has to be a compromise between employees and employers.  "

You are right Tank. If you want to use your device for official purpose; you have to abide for their regulations. No other options for you.

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Razia
Razia
2/9/2014 4:35:54 AM
User Rank
One Bar
Re: Personal devices
@MobileSuze. Its all maximizing the profitability and reducing the cost of production. BYOD programs are introduced so that the employees have the flexibility and ease and at the same time less burdensome on the organizational cost as well. Studies have shown that with the with the introduction of BYOD there is marked increase in the efficiency.  Of course, we have to regulate the implementation and policy adherence through the ingenuity of mind.

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